U.S. law schools face renewed scrutiny over claims about their ability to find work for their graduates, a crucial selling point amid one of the legal industry’s worst-ever job markets. Some of the schools have been creating temporary jobs for grads by paying nonprofits and others to employ them, a move that in some cases has boosted the schools’ standings in the much-followed U.S. News & World Report rankings. A new rule adopted last week by the accrediting arm of the American Bar Association will tighten such claims, giving law schools less credit for jobs that they subsidize.

These so-called “bridge-to-practice” fellowships typically pay graduates $1,000 to $4,000 a month for jobs in the nonprofit or public sectors that often expire within a year.http://on.wsj.com/1Ltj7N3

Advertisements